About

A copy of my CV can be found here.

I am currently a research fellow with the Centre for Political and Legal Analytics at Cardiff University.

In my research I seek to find answers to questions regarding interstate conflict and war. To this end, I have sought to understand how the issues states are disputing over affect their strategic behavior during war and other forms of interstate conflict. To find answers to these questions, I have employed a diverse array of methods and approaches. I have used sophisticated statistical techniques, world-wide surveys of expert opinion to create measures of issue divisibility and salience, and archival research. Ultimately, my research agenda makes a major contribution to our understanding of why some wars are especially long and why some states seem reluctant to end them.

I am also interested in understanding how democratic leaders respond to the multiple and competing pressures of prosecuting an interstate war. In recently completed work with co-authors, I have explored how democratic leaders balance electoral incentives against military success. We have found that this provides a compelling explanation for who lived and died in the Vietnam war and who was drafted during World War II. Ultimately, we find that US presidents in both of these instances took steps to protect swing voters from paying the highest costs of the war. The two papers mentioned above are currently under review. In addition to these papers, I am intending on examining this dynamic further in two future papers which will explore the political consequences of these decisions, as well as applying for grants to collect service records data from the UK, and tying the findings of these projects together into a book.

I am a dedicated and successful teacher. At the University of Georgia, I was the instructor of record for six courses. I taught honors and regular sections of Introduction to Global Issues, an upper division course on International Conflict, and Introduction to Comparative Politics.